The Utterness of Creation

This is the third and final essay in our series of studying each others’ poetry.

The Utterness of Creation

by Lynn Michael Martin

This week, I am discussing a poem by my friend Obi Martin—“Fixed Song.” In looking for a method by which to dissect the poem, I immediately gave significance to the title, which I think suggests the controlling idea of the poem. Continue reading . . . “The Utterness of Creation”

He Will Empty

The order of the next posts has changed slightly, but here is the second in our group of three posts. Next week will be by Lynn Martin.

He Will Empty

by Obi Martin

“Jabbok,” the name of the river that Jacob crossed, and where he wrestled God, means “he will empty.” He will empty of what? He will empty. Continue reading . . . “He Will Empty”

Snow Temple Summer

Three adventurous editors here at the Curator have agreed to attempt explicating each others’ work. In cold blood. Today, I do one of Lynn Martin’s, next week Lynn will do one of Obi Martin’s, and then Obi will do one of mine.

Snow Temple Summer

by Conrad Martin

On the clock of the year it is high noon and the world is a steady wealth of green and blue and all manner of teeming, trickling life. But once not long ago it was winter, and simple, and white. Continue reading . . . “Snow Temple Summer”

On Happy Endings

On Happy Endings

by Lynn Michael Martin

A year ago, I attended a writers’ conference in Washington, DC, with the Hedge Apple Magazine, which I was editing at the time. The cost of the conference covered a free subscription to a magazine of my choice, and I selected American Short Fiction, since I wanted to be more familiar with the fiction that is being published today. Continue reading . . . “On Happy Endings”

Explication of “Love Calls Us to the Things of This World”

Explication of “Love Calls Us to the Things of This World”

by Obi Martin

“Awakening” is a metaphor often used to characterize the life lived fully. For many of us in techno-informational society, it’s too easy to spend too much of our lives walking around in a malaise of unclarity and apathy, hobbled by plethora-induced stupors. Continue reading . . . “Explication of “Love Calls Us to the Things of This World””